Moving to a Care Community? Check the Fine Print

Reading the fine print when purchasing a home in a retirement community or a care community is intimidating. The typeface is tiny, you’ve got boxes to pack and movers to schedule and, well, you know the rest. What most people do, is hope for the best and sign. However, that can lead to trouble, advises Delco Times in the article “Planning Ahead: Moving to a care community? Read the agreement.”

If you don’t want to read the fine print or can’t make head or tails of what you are reading, one option is to ask your estate planning attorney to do so. Without someone reading through and understanding the contract, you and your family may be in for some unpleasant surprises. Here are some things to consider.

What kind of a community are you moving into? If you are moving to a Continuing Care or Life Care Community, your documents will probably have provisions regarding health insurance, entry fees, deposits, a schedule of costs, if you need additional services, fees for moving to a higher level of care and provisions for refunds and estate planning.

When you enter an Assisted Living facility, which is referred to as “Personal Care” in Pennsylvania, you may find yourself signing documents regarding everything from laundry policies, pharmacy choices, financial disclosures and statements of your rights as a resident. Not every document you sign will be critical, but you should understand everything you sign.

If moving into a nursing home that accepts Medicaid, you and your family need to know that nursing homes that accept Medicaid are not permitted to demand payment on admission from either an adult child or a power of attorney from their own funds. However, Pennsylvania does have support provisions regarding children, that are called “filial responsibility.” This should not be a problem, as long as you speak with an elder law attorney who can make sure you have completed the Medicaid application correctly and are in full compliance with all of the requirements.

If your adult children ask you to sign documents and “don’t worry” about what documents are, you may want to sit down with an attorney to review the documents. When someone is not trained to review these documents, they won’t know what red flags to look for.

If someone signs the document who is not the applicant/future resident, that person may become responsible for the costs, depending upon what role you have when you sign: are you a guarantor or indemnitor? That person typically agrees to pay after the applicant/resident’s funds are exhausted. The payments may have to come from their own funds. Sometimes the “responsible party” is simply the person who handles business matters on the applicant’s behalf. You’ll want to be sure that the person signing the papers understands what they are agreeing to.

Almost all agreements will say that the applicant, or the person receiving services, is responsible for payment from their own assets. However, if someone signing the documents is power of attorney, they need to be mindful of what they are signing up for.

If possible, the person who will receive services should be the one who signs any paperwork, but only after a thorough review from an experienced attorney.

Reference: Delco Times (Feb. 5, 20-19) “Planning Ahead: Moving to a care community? Read the agreement”

How Can I Make a Trip to the ER Easier for an Alzheimer’s Patient?

Trying to make someone with Alzheimer’s comfortable in an ER is not an easy thing. However, there are some things you can do to make the stimulation-saturated environment a little less overwhelming, says The Advocate in the article “Alzheimer’s Q&A: What should I know before taking someone with Alzheimer’s to the emergency room.”

Start long before you must go to the ER, by creating a list of your medications and have a few copies with you.

Bring the medication list and any assistive devices, including hearing aids, dentures, an extra pair of glasses and any walking aids, like a walker or a cane.

Also, have a list of contact information for all healthcare providers and family members. If you have a power of attorney, bring that as well. If the individual has an advance directive or any other documents, like a do not resuscitate (DNR), bring those just in case. Make sure to have all health insurance information.

Expect a wait, so bring snacks. A portable music player with the person’s favorite soothing music and headphones may provide some comfort. Magazines or books that are used during quiet times at home may be useful. Don’t bring anything of value, like jewelry or a wallet. And don’t bring a crowd. Small children, unless there is no one who can care for them, or other family members, are best left at home.

Unless the individual is having a life-threatening emergency, you will likely have to wait, and you may be waiting a while. Provide simple step-by-step explanations of what is taking place and be honest with them about why they are in the hospital and what is happening.

Focus on keeping them calm and comfortable. Offer a snack and if possible, find a quiet space in the waiting room.

Make sure that the hospital staff is aware you are there with a person who has Alzheimer’s or dementia. They may not have training in caring for dementia patients, so be prepared to advocate for your parent or loved one. Offer suggestions in communicating with the person and ask doctors and medical personnel to limit their questions, which may increase stress and anxiety. Speak with the doctor privately, if possible.

Request that the staff avoid using any physical restraints or medications to control the person’s behavior, unless absolutely necessary. Let the staff know about any fever, medication side effects or changes in mental status. Never leave the person alone in the ER or the evaluation room.

Reference: The Advocate (Jan. 20, 2019) “Alzheimer’s Q&A: What should I know before taking someone with Alzheimer’s to the emergency room”

What if Your Heir Dies Before You?

The idea of a child dying before a parent is a heartbreaking thing to consider. However, these sad events do take place. The difficulty of discussing this might lead you away from thinking about it when doing your estate plan, but that’s not a productive response. The article “Legal Matters: If predeceased by an heir in a valid will, what happens with that inheritance?” from Carroll County Times tackles this topic without flinching.

First, review your will with your estate planning attorney to see if your will has already made a provision for this event. Your will should be reviewed from time to time anyway, especially when there has been a major tax law change. If there is nothing in your will currently addressing this situation, you can change the will to what you would want to happen.

If you don’t make this change and a child predeceases you, the laws of your state will govern what happens.

In Maryland, the law of the Estates and Trusts Code says that your child’s estate will still receive the share you had designed in your will, regardless of whether they died before you. Therefore, whoever is an heir to your child’s estate, will receive what your deceased child was awarded in your will.

The law also states that the legatee—your deceased child—must be identified in the will to receive whatever share of your estate you directed. If you don’t want to leave a portion of your estate to the heirs of your deceased son or daughter, you must specify exactly how you want your estate to be divided, if one of your children should die before you do.

Is it worth getting into these specifics? Yes. For one example, if you’ve had a bitter feud with a son-in-law for decades and you don’t want to leave him anything, then you’ll want to make sure to specify that in your will.

Each state has its own laws governing what occurs when an heir predeceases the parent. For example, in the past in Maryland, a legatee’s right to receive a share of the estate did not enjoy any protection, if he died before the author of the will. If the will did not contain specific directions on how that share should be distributed if the legatee died before the author of the will, the share simply remained in the estate, and the legatee’s heirs did not receive any assets.

Speak with a local estate planning attorney to clarify what would happen to your assets and what you would like to have happen.

Reference: Carroll County Times (Dec. 21, 2018) “Legal Matters: If predeceased by an heir in a valid will, what happens with that inheritance?”

Stressed About Estate Planning? We’ve Got You Covered.

Valentine’s Day is all about showing the ones you love how much you care about them. In many ways, the same goes for estate planning. The purpose of this process is mainly to establish how your money and assets will be divided and where that capital will go when you pass away. This can be a daunting task when you begin to think about it, but we are more than willing to aid in making the process a lot less stressful and a lot more simple. Here’s how the process works.

We’ll start by scheduling a free consultation with you to determine what kind of legal documents you need. Mr. Banton will meet with you and walk you through an estate planning packet; the questions will be relatively simple and should help clear some things up. This is where you will decide where you want your money to go. Keep in mind any children, spouses, family members, close friends and charities you might want to include. Make sure to ask us about including a letter to your loved ones in your estate plan. If at any moment during this consultation you have a question you may ask him and he will do his best to answer all of your questions.

If you decide that you want to go through with your estate plan, we will request a retainer fee before we begin working on it and should have a draft out to you within a week. After you’ve looked over the document and the correct changes have been made, we will schedule a date and time for you to come in and sign your documents with our notary. After the signing we make copies and package the original. When this is complete you can either pick it up at our office or request that it be mailed to you.

With time comes change, and that change can ultimately effect your estate plan, meaning you will have to update it. That can end up costing a lot of money in the long run and you might want to consider our maintenance plan that is included with our VIP Client Care Package. To go into more depth on why it’s important to maintain your estate plan, click here.

For more information about an estate plan, call us at (636)259-3350.

Thinking about Giving It All Away? Here’s What You Need to Know
Taking care of the next generation.

Thinking about Giving It All Away? Here’s What You Need to Know

There are some individuals who just aren’t interested in handing down their assets to the next generation when they die. Perhaps their children are so successful, they don’t need an inheritance. Or, according to the article “Giving your money away when you die: 10 questions to ask” from MarketWatch, they may be more interested in the kind of impact they can have on the lives of others.

If you haven’t thought about charitable giving or estate planning, these 10 questions should prompt some thought and discussion with family members:

Should you give money away now? Don’t give away money or assets you’ll need to pay your living expenses, unless you have what you need for retirement and any bumps that may come up along the way. There are no limits to the gifts you can make to a charity.

Do you have the right beneficiaries listed on retirement accounts and life insurance policies? If you want these assets to go to the right person or place, make sure the beneficiary names are correct. Note that there are rules, usually from the financial institution, about who can be a beneficiary—some require it be a person and do not permit the beneficiary to be an organization.

Who do you want making end-of-life decisions, and how much intervention do you want to prolong your life? A health care power of attorney and living will are used to express these wishes. Without these documents, your family may not know what you want. Healthcare providers won’t know and will have to make decisions based on law, and not your wishes.

Do you have a will? Many Americans do not, and it creates stress, adds costs and creates real problems for their family members. Make an appointment with an estate planning attorney to put your wishes into a will.

Are you worried about federal estate taxes? Unless you are in the 1%, your chances of having to pay federal taxes are slim to none. However, if your will was created to address federal estate taxes from back in the days when it was a problem, you may have a strategy that no longer works. This is another reason to meet with your estate planning attorney.

Does your state have estate or inheritance taxes? This is more likely to be where your heirs need to come up with the money to pay taxes on your estate. A local estate planning attorney will be able to help you make a plan, so that your heirs will have the resources to pay these costs.

Should you keep your Roth IRA for an heir? Leaving a Roth IRA for an heir, could be a generous bequest. You may also want to encourage your heirs to start and fund Roth IRAs of their own, if they have earned income. Even small sums, over time, can grow to significant wealth.

Are you giving money to reputable charities? Make sure the organizations you are supporting, while you are alive or through your will, are using resources correctly. Good online sources include GuideStar.org or CharityNavigator.org.

Could you save more on taxes? Donating appreciated assets might help lower your taxes. Donating part or all your annual Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) can do the same, as long as you are over 70½ years old.

Does your family know what your wishes are? To avoid any turmoil when you pass, talk with family members about what you want to happen when you are gone. Make sure they know where your estate planning documents are and what you want in the way of end-of-life care. Having a conversation about your legacy and what your hopes and dreams are for family members, can be eye-opening for the younger members of the family and give you some deep satisfaction.

Reference: MarketWatch (Oct. 30, 2018) “Giving your money away when you die: 10 questions to ask”

Include a Letter with Your Estate Plan

You have your vital documents in order, and you keep them current. You have a will or trust. Your living will, also called health care power of attorney is complete, and you have spoken with the person you have named as your health care decision-maker about your end-of-life wishes. You have taken care of all your legal and financial issues, including final instructions and a list of who will receive particular items.

While your loved ones will appreciate that you have thoughtfully taken care of these essential issues and will not leave them with a mess to clean up one day, there is one more thing you should do. You need to sit down and create something your family members and close friends will treasure for the rest of their lives. You should write and include a letter with your estate plan.

Words are Important

People can carry sadness for a lifetime because a parent never said “I love you” to the child. The parent might be shocked that the child felt unloved. Some people think they do not have to tell someone they love them, because they show their affection in the daily tasks of providing a home and upbringing for the child.

In addition to the worldly goods that you give to your loved ones, leaving a “last letter” behind can help them deal with their grief at losing you. You can use the letter to accomplish things you might not have done as much as you wish you had. You can write one letter that speaks to several people or write multiple letters.

What to Put in the Letter

You can begin by telling the people in the letter that they are important to you. You should tell them that you love them and let them know in writing how proud you are of them. No matter how many times you have spoken these words to them before, they can hold a letter in their hands for years and read it over and over.

Sometimes people write letters of apology to those they have hurt at some point in their lives. Apologies are helpful in making peace with one’s life. If you cannot bring yourself to say the words during your lifetime or you anticipate that the person would respond in an unacceptable manner, you can do your part by putting the apology in a letter.

If you can forgive someone who did something wrong to you, it can be cathartic to write a letter of forgiveness. These letters take great care, as they can be interpreted as sanctimonious or judgmental.

What Not to Put in the Letter

While it might be tempting to take one last jab at someone you feel wronged you, the last letter is no time to be spiteful. If you cannot write something kind to a person, do not write anything.

What to Do with the Letter

All you need to do is tuck the letter in with your legal papers. One day, when your loved ones go through your will or trust, they will get a pleasant surprise and something to cherish.

You should talk with an elder law attorney near you about the ways that your state rules might vary from the general law of this article.

References:

AARP. “How to Write a Last Letter to Your Loved Ones.” (accessed January 8, 2019) https://www.aarp.org/retirement/planning-for-retirement/info-2018/letter-to-remember.html